Indepth Psychology: Helping women with body image issues and eating disordersIndepth Psychology: Helping adults with anxiety and phobiasIndepth Psychology: Supporting adults through grief and loss and major life changesIndepth Psychology: Helping adults with stress management and self esteem

Resources

 

We often recommend books and other resources to our clients, either as part of their therapy or something they might find helpful to work on alongside their treatment. Below are some of our top recommendations for self-help and other resources.

 

Please note, if you click on a link below to buy a resource, we’ll receive a small payment at no extra cost to you (we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites).

 

Eating Disorders

 

Overcoming Binge Eating, 2nd Edition

 

 

This is by far the book we recommend most often. We recommend it as part of the standard treatment approach, which suits most people we see for eating disorders therapy.

 

 

8 Keys to Recovery from an Eating Disorder

 



 

This is another excellent book to help you if you’re wanting to recover from an eating disorder. It’s especially good because both authors have themselves recovered from eating disorders, and so offer a more personal perspective in addition to their professional perspective as therapists. There is also an accompanying workbook available.

 

If not dieting, then what?

 

 

This book is particularly good for those who struggle with being overweight or obese. There’s a vast amount of research indicating that diets aren’t effective – this book helps you develop a better relationship with eating and your body rather than staying caught in endless dieting.

 

General Mental Health

 
The Happiness Trap
 

 

This book is based on a different therapeutic approach, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Rather than focusing on evaluating your thinking, this approach helps you develop greater acceptance of your thoughts and feelings, which paradoxically helps you feel much better.